Alt Codes for Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian & Montenegrin Accented Letters

Below is the complete list of keyboard shortcuts using Windows Alt codes for letters with accents or diacritics that are used in writing in the the Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian & Montenegrin languages. If you are new to Alt codes and need detailed instructions on how to use them, please read How to Use Alt Codes to Enter Special Characters. Alternatively, instead of using Alt codes, you can also just quickly tap or click any accented letter in the list below to copy it and paste it into your document.

WP Data Tables

Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian, and Montenegrin are closely related South Slavic languages, and they are often collectively referred to as “BCMS.” While they share a high degree of mutual intelligibility, they have certain differences in vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammar. However, they have separate standard varieties and minor variations in their respective language standards.

In the Latin script used for these languages, several letters can be accompanied by diacritics or accents. Here is a list of letters with diacritics used in some specific contexts:

  1. Ć (C with acute): Represents the sound /t͡ɕ/ in these languages. It is equivalent to the English “ch” sound in “chat.”
  2. Č (C with caron): Represents the sound /tʃ/ in these languages, similar to the English “ch” sound in “chocolate.”
  3. Đ (D with stroke): Represents the voiced dental fricative sound /ð/ in these languages. It is similar to the English “th” sound in “this.”
  4. Š (S with caron): Represents the sound /ʃ/ in these languages, similar to the English “sh” sound in “she.”
  5. Ž (Z with caron): Represents the sound /ʒ/ in these languages, similar to the “s” sound in the English word “measure” or the “g” sound in “genre.”

It’s important to note that the usage of diacritics may vary slightly between the different language standards. For example, the Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian standards generally use the same Latin script with minimal differences, while Montenegrin may have some specific orthographic variations. Additionally, some publications or contexts may choose to omit diacritics for practical reasons, especially in informal writing or online communication.

Overall, the diacritics in these languages play a crucial role in distinguishing certain phonetic sounds and preserving the distinct characteristics of each language variety while maintaining a high level of mutual intelligibility among them.

For Alt codes for letters with accents or diacritical marks that are used in other foreign languages, visit Alt Codes for Latin Letters with Accents or Diacritical Marks used in Foreign Languages. For the the complete list of the first 256 Windows Alt Codes, visit Windows Alt Codes for Special Characters & Symbols.