€ Euro Sign Alt Code

Below is the Alt code keyboard shortcut for inserting the European Union Euro sign currency symbol and Euro-currency sign. If you are new to Alt codes and need detailed instructions on how to use them, please read How to Use Alt Codes to Enter Special Characters. The Alt code for the Euro (€) currency symbol on Windows systems is 0128 or 8364. To enter the Euro symbol using the Alt code, you need to hold down the Alt key and, while keeping it pressed, type 0128 or 8364 using the numeric keypad. Then, release the Alt key, and the Euro symbol (€) should appear. On an Apple Mac US keyboard, press the Option key, Shift key and number 2 key simultaneously, then release. Please note that this method may not work with all keyboards or software applications, as it depends on the specific configuration and character encoding settings. If these methods do not work, simply copy and paste the Euro sign below.

Click the Euro sign symbol to copy:

Symbol
Symbol NameEuro sign
Windows Alt CodeAlt 0128 or Alt 8364
Windows Alt X Code20AC Alt X
Mac Option Key ShortcutOption + Shift + 2
HTML Entity
Named Character
Reference
€
HTML Entity
Numeric Character Reference (Hexadecimal)
&#x20AC
HTML Entity
Numeric Character Reference (Decimal)
&#8364
Unicode Code PointU+20AC
Symbol
Symbol NameEuro-currency sign
Windows Alt CodeAlt 8352
Windows Alt X Code20A0 Alt X
Mac Option Key ShortcutOption + Shift + 2
HTML Entity
Named Character
Reference
n/a
HTML Entity
Numeric Character Reference (Hexadecimal)
&#x20A0
HTML Entity
Numeric Character Reference (Decimal)
&#8352
Unicode Code PointU+20A0

Origin, Meaning and Usage of the Euro Currency Symbol €

The Euro (€) is the currency symbol used to represent the official currency of the Eurozone, which is a monetary union of 19 of the 27 member states of the European Union (EU). The Euro was introduced in 1999 as an electronic currency for banking and financial transactions, and euro banknotes and coins were introduced in 2002.

The design of the Euro symbol was selected through a public competition held by the European Commission in 1996. The winning design, created by a Belgian designer named Alain Billiet, consists of a stylized letter “E” with two parallel lines across it, symbolizing stability.

The Euro symbol is widely recognized and used in countries that have adopted the Euro as their official currency. It is used on euro banknotes, coins, financial documents, and price tags. The symbol is usually placed before the numerical value of the amount, such as €10.00.

The Euro symbol is a distinct visual representation of the Euro currency and is protected by copyright. It cannot be used without permission for commercial purposes, except by official institutions and entities authorized by the European Central Bank (ECB).

On the other hand, the symbol for the European Currency Unit (ECU) is ₠. The European Currency Unit (ECU) was an artificial currency unit used by the European Community (the predecessor of the European Union) from 1979 to 1998 as a unit of account for monetary transactions. It was not a physical currency but rather a basket of currencies representing the average value of participating European currencies.

The symbol ₠, a stylized letter “E” with two horizontal lines, was created to represent the European Currency Unit (ECU). However, the ECU ceased to exist as a unit of account on January 1, 1999, when it was replaced by the euro as the official currency of the Eurozone countries.

Since the adoption of the euro, the € symbol has been used to represent the euro currency. The euro (€) is a physical currency used by 19 of the 27 member states of the European Union. It is used for everyday transactions, pricing, accounting, and financial activities within the Eurozone.

In summary, ₠ was the symbol used for the European Currency Unit (ECU) which predated the euro, while € is the symbol used for the euro currency that replaced the ECU.

It’s worth noting that not all European Union member states have adopted the Euro as their currency. Some countries, like the United Kingdom, Denmark, Sweden, and others, have chosen to maintain their own national currencies. However, even in those countries, the Euro symbol is sometimes used in financial contexts to denote the Euro equivalent of a price or value.

The Euro currency symbol (€) is a part of the set of Alt Codes for Currency Symbols & Signs. For the the complete list of the ASCII based Windows Alt Codes, refer to Windows Alt Codes for Special Characters & Symbols.